Fall Exhibitions

Cedric Bomford & Jim Bomford: The Traveller

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September 17 – December 18, 2016

Opening reception: Friday, September 16, 6-10pm

Like the vernacular and provisional architectural expressions found in resource camps, or in the initial building stages of both urban and rural communities referenced in previous work by Cedric Bomford, this project takes early settler infrastructure as its foundation, in particular the eccentric buildings and machines that were built to perform a specific task, and which would subsequently be discarded once the task was complete.

Jasmina Cibic: Tear Down and Rebuild

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September 17 – December 18, 2016

Opening reception: Friday, September 16, 6-10pm

Working between London and Ljubljana, Jasmina Cibic is among a new generation of Slovenian artists whose practice, although acutely conscious of a specific national political, cultural, and artistic lineage, creates a very distinctive language of its own. Cibic’s films, sculptures, and performances focus on the mechanisms that assist in the creation of (trans)national myths, as well as how the authority that delegated them in the first place deals with these myths once their representative moments have lapsed. Esker Foundation is pleased to present several works of Cibic’s, including Tear Down and Rebuild (2015) and Show the Land In Which a Wide Space For National Progress Is Ensured (2015).

Larissa Fassler: CIVIC. CENTRE.

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September 17 – December 18, 2016

Opening reception: Friday, September 16, 6-10pm

For Larissa Fassler, observing, describing, and naming are strategies to make different realities visible, an approach she believes leads to a deeper understanding of a place, or that counters assumptions, blindness, or even refusals to see reality. For the past ten years, Fassler has been making map-drawing hybrids and objects of urban spaces that comfortably exist between models, sculptures, and relational actions. Her work is developed using a self-mapping exercise, walking, counting, and note taking, often charting the same territory multiple times, which generates a series of interpretations of the same space that differ in precision, dimensions, and proportions. These notations are then transcribed or modeled to activate each layer of architectural detail, advertising slogan, conversation, action, or census-like observations of highly complex public sites.