Archived Exhibitions

Etienne Zack: Those lacking imagination take refuge in reality

Zack_Web-icon

May 28 – August 28, 2016

Opening reception: Friday, May 27, 6-10pm

This exhibition will present a series of recent paintings that continues Etienne Zack’s interest in the relationship between art and text. Following the conceptual line of previous work, these paintings are complex considerations of architecture, institutional power, redacted history, and the use of text as form, idea, and structure. Each painting is a highly composed study of accumulation, omission, and revision. Suggestive documents are stacked, slotted together, and carved into letter-like forms; penetrating neon lights and electric cords ending in bare light bulbs glow in stark contrast to the shadowy slashes and blocks of paint that suggest the counterpoint to enlightenment: censorship and erasure. As Zack states, “The paintings explore an area where written language is either absent or implied, yet through their assembled architectures communication and thinking spatially materialize.” This is the first major exhibition of Zack’s paintings in Alberta.

Jack Bush: In Studio

Jack Bush with unidentified assistant (January 1971) in the artist’s Wolseley Street studio, Toronto. Photo by Karol Ike.

January 23 – May 8, 2016

In the most classic sense, the word studio is defined as “room for study.” This exhibition was conceived as an opportunity to gather 20 select paintings in a new space with the aim to spark study – in the form of looking and conversation.

Five works on show have never before been exhibited in Canada. Fifteen of the paintings were made in the artist’s small one-room studio in his family home at 1 Eastview Crescent in North Toronto, while the remaining five were produced in his downtown Toronto Wolseley Street studio, where he would execute most of his very large paintings from 1968 until his death in January 1977.

Colleen Heslin: Needles and Pins

Photo courtesy of the artist

January 23 – May 8, 2016

Colleen Heslin’s paintings resonate with the tension of material and gestural complexity. Successfully fusing thought and action, the work dismantles material hierarchy by providing equal space to art and craft. Considering formal abstraction and craft-based methods of mark making, Heslin’s work thoroughly explores colour, shape, and texture. Constructed out of hand-dyed and ink-stained fabric, the work acknowledges histories of photography and textiles, and finds connections with the Colour Field painters of the 1960s and 1970s.

Charlotte Moth: living images

CM_icon

September 26 – December 20, 2015

Charlotte Moth’s multi-layered work demonstrates her interest in the relationships among photography, sculpture, architecture, memory, and history. Her in-depth research process and the conceptual fluidity of her work poetically interlace architectural projects, archival materials, notions of itinerancy, filmic and art historical references, as well as the objects and places that surround us. In addition to a selection of recent films, photographs, and sculptural works, Esker Foundation is pleased to present a co-commission of new work made in partnership with The Banff Centre, supported by a Paul D. Fleck Fellowship residency.

Celia Perrin Sidarous: Interiors, Other Chambers

Celia Perrin Sidarous

September 26 – December 20, 2015

Celia Perrin Sidarous’ photographic works present intuitively organized collages and sculptural assemblages that offer a gorgeous and considered way of looking at collected objects and how the visual language of photography and the studio transforms them. As striking arrangements of colour, form, and shape that reference histories of still life, interior arrangement, and display, Perrin Sidarous’ images also suggest the implicit associations and secret affinities between objects and materials.

Mia Feuer: Synthetic Seasons

Mia Feuer, Boreal, 2013, (detail). Photo: Sue Wrbican

May 23 – September 6, 2015

Mia Feuer is interested in the post-natural landscape, visible sites where human interaction – be it personal, social, political, or financial – has altered or is in the process of rapidly changing the land, and thus our relationship to it. Her work makes connections between our intense material dependency and the accelerated environmental impact this creates.