Exhibitions

Liz Magor: One Bedroom Apartment

September 26 - December 20, 2020

As one of Canada’s most important artists, Liz Magor has been producing a broad spectrum of sculptural objects, installations, and photography since the mid-1970s. She is best known for sculptures made from both found and cast objects that quietly, yet intensely pull our focus to the things that surround us everyday. Often presenting delicate items in harsh places, Magor creates structures that support fragile and vulnerable things; a practice, one could say, of care. Her work reveals how ordinary objects contain latent qualities that are obscured by our intentions as we acquire, use, and discard these items. In her sculptural arrangements Magor allows things to form relationships with each other that reveal their emotional and historic burdens and strengths.

Samuel Roy-Bois: Presences

September 26 - December 20, 2020

Curated by Charo Neville Samuel Roy-Bois’ artistic practice involves sitespecific installations concerned with the conceptual and material definition of space and the ways the built environment contributes to our understanding of the world. Through sculpture, photography, and installation, Roy-Bois examines >> read more

Jon Sasaki: Killing One Bird with Half a Stone

September 26 - December 20, 2020

Jon Sasaki’s multidisciplinary practice delves into the potentially generative outcomes of failure and futility. Sasaki’s solo exhibition at Esker Foundation will centre around a selection of his videos from the past decade that depict the artist’s persistent, sometimes reckless refusal >> read more

Katie Ohe

January 25 - September 6, 2020

Esker Foundation is pleased to present an in-depth look at Katie Ohe’s sculptural practice and her unparalleled approach to material, form, space, and movement.

This exhibition will bring together sculptural work spanning six decades of Ohe’s remarkable career, marking the largest and most comprehensive solo exhibition of her work to date. The exhibition will also draw from Ohe’s material archive, revealing a glimpse of a process devoted to research, inquiry, and visual or formal problem solving.

Ohe is best known for her abstract steel sculptures; organic forms that evoke the undulatory surface of a pool of water, the crest of a rolling hill or cumulonimbus cloud, or the cadence of a walking figure. The surfaces of many of these sculptures are subsequently chromed or polished, creating a flawlessly smooth exterior that conjures an illusion of weightlessness and is also irresistible to touch. Indeed, many of Ohe’s works are fully activated only by the push of a human hand. She remarks, “I want my sculptures to induce or invoke touch before you think that you really shouldn’t.”

Anna Gustafson: Object Lessons

February 3 - August 9, 2020

Presented in partnership with The New Gallery As we deplete the earth’s resources to manufacture and power consumer products, we destroy ecosystems. When such objects are deemed obsolete, these pieces of our contemporary material culture are consigned to landfills and >> read more

Jeffrey Gibson: Time Carriers

September 28 - December 20, 2019

‘Time Carriers’ conjures a vision of many hands providing a framework of support, a fluid utopia where trust and movement go hand in hand. It evokes a time frame that both unites and collapses present, past, and future into an undulating and responsive single unit, something that could best be described as community or family. This idea is especially appropriate when considering Jeffrey Gibson’s work, as he has always pushed to create kinship among unlikely partners. Collaboration is at the heart of his practice; working and learning with artists and craftspeople as a way to resist acculturation, support a strong legacy of making, and to build and honour community.

Jeffrey Gibson: To Name An Other

October 19, 2019

Saturday 19 October, 3-4pm, free Atlantic Avenue Art Block Lobby Fall Exhibitions & Programs Brochure In a special performance as part of Jeffrey Gibson’s exhibition Time Carriers at Esker Foundation, fifty performers were brought together for a drumming event to >> read more

Nep Sidhu: Divine of Form, Formed in the Divine (Medicine for a Nightmare)

September 28 - December 20, 2019

Curated by cheyanne turions

‘Divine of Form, Formed in the Divine (Medicine for a Nightmare)’ examines how memories persist in the present, especially when related to personal and collective practices of resistance, resilience, and ritual. This mid-career survey is anchored by recent works that reflect upon Sikh histories amongst other collectively formed and formative histories considered through collaborations with Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes and Nicholas Galanin. Across different bodies of work produced over the last decade, Sidhu explores how memorialization practices can transfigure grief and loss, and how they can speak to the power and harmony of the divine.

The exhibition is produced in partnership with Mercer Union, Toronto and Esker Foundation, Calgary.
Support in part for the project is through the Ontario Arts Council.

Marjie Crop Eared Wolf: Iitsi’poyi

October 28, 2019 - January 26, 2020

Marjie Crop Eared Wolf continues her ongoing project to learn Blackfoot in the drawing, sound, and video installation, ‘Iitsi’poyi.’ Using thousands of Blackfoot words transcribed from the ‘Blackfoot Dictionary’ as well as an audio tape made by her mother, this work addresses cultural legacy and resilience by actively engaging in language preservation.

Kablusiak: Qiniqtuaq

July 29 - October 20, 2019

Project Space

‘Qiniqtuaq’ (searching/looking) invites viewers to peer through a multi-eyed ghost sheet to witness a looping projection of a video collage screened in front of a piece of oil-stained cardboard. ‘Qiniqtuaq’ is meant to evoke a dream-like state imaging a hypothetical place and time; a representation of what is felt but not known. ‘Qiniqtuaq’ invites a presence of nostalgia, spectatorship, and diaspora.

Kablusiak is an Inuvialuk artist and curator based in Mohkinstsis and holds a BFA in Drawing from the Alberta University of the Arts, Calgary. They use art and humour as a coping mechanism to address cultural displacement. The lighthearted nature of their practice extends gestures of empathy and solidarity; these interests invite a reconsideration of the perceptions of contemporary Indigeneity.